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Book suggestions for Tony Hawks Pro Skater

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The Mutt: How to Skateboard and Not Kill Yourself

Author Rodney Mullen
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Published 2004-07-20

A world-champion freestyle skateboarder traces the history of skating as well as the story of his own life, describing his family of overachievers, his father's disapproval of the author's skating ambitions, the disability that challenged his career, and his successes as an extreme sportsperson and multi-million-dollar skateboard company owner.

Hawk: Occupation: Skateboarder

Author Tony Hawk
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Published 2010-09-21

For Tony Hawk, it wasn't enough to skate for two decades, to invent more than eighty tricks, and to win more than twice as many professional contests as any other skater.It wasn't enough to knock himself unconscious more than ten times, fracture several ribs, break his elbow, knock out his teeth twice, compress the vertebrae in his back, pop his bursa sack, get more than fifty stitches laced into his shins, rip apart the cartilage in his knee, bruise his tailbone, sprain his ankles, and tear his ligaments too many times to count.No.He had to land the 900. And after thirteen years of failed attempts, he nailed it. It had never been done before. Growing up in Sierra Mesa, California, Tony was a hyperactive demon child with an I44 IQ. He threw tantrums, terrorized the nanny until she quit, exploded with rage whenever he lost a game; this was a kid who was expelled from preschool. When his brother, Steve, gave him a blue plastic hand-me-down skateboard and his father built a skate ramp in the driveway, Tony finally found his outlet--while skating, he could be as hard on himself as he was on everyone around him. But it wasn't an easy ride to the top of the skating game. Fellow skaters mocked his skating style and dubbed him a circus skater. He was so skinny he had to wear elbow pads on his knees, and so light he had to ollie just to catch air off a ramp. He was so desperate to be accepted by young skating legends like Steve Caballero, Mike McGill, and Christian Hosoi that he ate gum from between Steve's toes. But a few years of determination and hard work paid off in multiple professional wins, and the skaters who once had mocked him were now trying to learn his tricks. Tony had created a new style of skating. In Hawk Tony goes behind the scenes of competitions, demos, and movies and shares the less glamorous demands of being a skateboarder--from skating on Italian TV wearing see-through plastic shorts to doing a demo in Brazil after throwing up for five days straight from food poisoning. He's dealt with teammates who lit themselves and other subjects on fire, driving down a freeway as the dashboard of their van burned. He's gone through the unpredictable ride of the skateboard industry during which, in the span of a few years, his annual income shrank to what he had made in a single month and then rebounded into seven figures. But Tony's greatest difficulty was dealing with the loss of his number one fan and supporter--his dad, Frank Hawk. With brutal honesty, Tony recalls the stories of love, loss, bad hairdos, embarrassing '80s clothes, and his determination that had shaped his life. As he takes a look back at his experiences with the skateboarding legends of the '70s, '80s, and '90s, including Stacy Peralta, Eddie Elguera, Lance Mountain, Mark Gonzalez, Bob Burnquist, and Colin Mckay, he tells the real history of skateboarding--and also what the future has in store for the sport and for him.

How Did I Get Here?

Author Tony Hawk
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Published 2010

The most famous skateboarder ever shares the business secrets to his success He's the man who put skateboarding on the map. He's the first to land a 900 (two and a half full rotations). He's also among the richest pitchmen in any sport.

Between Boardslides and Burnout

Author Tony Hawk
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Published 2002-09-17

With this all-access pass, Tony Hawk shares the joy, the exhaustion, the adrenaline, and the pain of life on the road. Between Boardslides and Burnout puts you right on the edge of the ramp and on the road with him -- from competitions to demos, to store openings, to autograph signings, to movie sets, and back home. Never before has a professional skateboarder offered such a complete look into his life -- and mind.

Dogtown: The Legend of the Z-Boys

Author Craig Stecyk
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Published 2002

The acclaimed book that chronicles in words and pictures a decade in the lives of the Z-Boys, the group of underground surfers who turned the world of skateboarding on its head. Including the best of the DogTown articles originally written by C.R.Stecyk III for Skateboarder Magazine, and hundreds of never-before-seen images from the archive of Glen E Friedman, the book was made into an award winning documentary, and later on a film Kings of Dogtown.

Skater Girl: A Girl's Guide to Skateboarding

Author Patty Segovia
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Published 2006-12-15

Colorful introduction to skateboarding for girls.

The Impossible

Author Cole Louison
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Published 2011

The Impossible aims to get skateboarding right. Journalist Cole Louison gets inside the history, culture, and major personalities of skating.

Urethane Revolution

Author John O'Malley
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Published 2019-04-22

One crazy year on the California coast--in 1975 a hippie skunkworks, bred in garages and shacks, launched the modern skater movement. Strap in for a wild ride replete with two car chases, two plane crashes, a massive truck bomb, Colombian narcos, the Mafia, senior White House staff, a gypsy fortuneteller, three straight-up miracles, Jacques Cousteau, big piles of cocaine and naked hippie chicks. Author John O'Malley was in the thick of it all, and he retraces the trip that starts with a bang and races to a melt-in-your-mouth ending.

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