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The Age of Empires

Nicholas Doumanis
|
2007

Draws on a wide range of authentic sources to trace the story of thirteen modern empires, in a lavishly illustrated account that evaluates the role of the empire in the western political landscape and considers such related topics as the role of women, ecological factors, and the contributions of explorers.

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On War

Carl von Clausewitz
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2007

Intended for military strategists, politicians, and others. This abridged edition deals with the subject of war, and selects the central books in which the author's views on the nature and theory of war are developed.

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Winter's Fire

Giles Kristian
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2016-04-07

Ben Kane Norway, AD 785 – a vow of vengeance must be kept . . . Sigurd Haraldarson has proved himself a great warrior . . . and a dangerous enemy. He has gone a long way towards avenging the murder of his family. And yet the oath-breaker King Gorm, who betrayed Sigurd’s father, still lives. And so long as he draws breath, the scales remain unbalanced. The sacred vow to avenge his family burns in Sigurd’s veins, but he must be patient and bide his time. He knows that he and his band of warriors are not yet strong enough to confront the treacherous king. They need silver, they need more spear-brothers to rally to the young Viking’s banner – but more than these, they need to win fame upon the battlefield. And so the fellowship venture west, to Sweden, to fight as mercenaries. And it is there – in the face of betrayal and bloodshed, on a journey that will take him all too close to the halls of Valhalla – that Sigurd’s destiny will be forged. There, in the inferno of winter’s fire . . . The Vikings return in this thrilling, thunderous sequel to Giles Kristian’s bestselling God of Vengeance.

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Pride of Carthage

David Anthony Durham
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2006-01

A saga set against the backdrop of the ancient Punic Wars describes Hannibal's struggle against the Roman Republic, his decision to attack Rome via a land route deemed impossible, and a young Roman military leader who defeated him.

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Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World

Jack Weatherford
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2005-03-22

The startling true history of how one extraordinary man from a remote cornerof the world created an empire that led the world into the modern age. The Mongol army led by Genghis Khan subjugated more lands and people in twenty-five years than the Romans did in four hundred. In nearly every country the Mongols conquered, they brought an unprecedented rise in cultural communication, expanded trade, and a blossoming of civilization. Vastly more progressive than his European or Asian counterparts, Genghis Khan abolished torture, granted universal religious freedom, and smashed feudal systems of aristocratic privilege. From the story of his rise through the tribal culture to the explosion of civilization that the Mongol Empire unleashed, this brilliant work of revisionist history is nothing less than the epic story of how the modern world was made.

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The Race for Paradise

Paul M. Cobb
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2014-07-24

In 1099, when the first crusaders arrived triumphant and bloody before the walls of Jerusalem, they carved out a Christian European presence in the Islamic world that remained for centuries, bolstered by subsequent waves of new crusades and pilgrimages. But how did medieval Muslims understand these events? What does an Islamic history of the Crusades look like? The answers may surprise you. In The Race for Paradise, we see medieval Muslims managing this new and long-lived Crusader threat not simply as victims or as victors, but as everything in-between, on all shores of the Muslim Mediterranean, from Spain to Syria. This is not just a straightforward tale of warriors and kings clashing in the Holy Land - of military confrontations and enigmatic heroes such as the great sultan Saladin. What emerges is a more complicated story of border-crossers and turncoats; of embassies and merchants; of scholars and spies, all of them seeking to manage this new threat from the barbarian fringes of their ordered world. When seen from the perspective of medieval Muslims, the Crusades emerge as something altogether different from the high-flying rhetoric of the European chronicles: as a diplomatic chess-game to be mastered, a commercial opportunity to be seized, a cultural encounter shaping Muslim experiences of Europeans until the close of the Middle Ages - and, as so often happened, a political challenge to be exploited by ambitious rulers making canny use of the language of jihad.

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